0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

In This Article

Uncontrolled diabetes puts you at greater risk of stroke
25225

Uncontrolled diabetes puts you at greater risk of stroke

People with diabetes may have poorer post-stroke outcomes and a higher risk of stroke recurrence, say experts

People with diabetes are at a greater risk of having a stroke

People with chronic diabetes are at higher risk of stroke. They are also likely to have a stroke earlier than those of the same age group without diabetes. Recurrent strokes are also more common in such people, making diabetes one of the main reasons for stroke-related mortalities across the globe.

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when there is a disruption in the blood supply to the brain. Dr Sanjay Pandey, HOD, neurology department, Amrita Hospital, Faridabad, explains that it is caused due to damage or blockage in carotid arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the brain. According to a review article published in Journal of Stroke, people with diabetes may have poorer post-stroke outcomes and a higher risk of stroke recurrence than those without diabetes.

Types of Stroke

1. Ischemic Stroke

Dr Thejaswi N Marla, cardiothoracic vascular Surgeon, Fortis Malar Hospital, Chennai, explains that in an ischemic stroke, there is a blockage or clot in blood vessels supplying oxygenated blood to the brain. This causes poor blood supply to the brain and affects brain function due to insufficient oxygen. Diabetes increases the risk of ischemic stroke by accelerating atherosclerosis (narrowing of arteries due to plaque formation), which makes the blood more prone to clotting.

2. Hemorrhagic Stroke

This stroke occurs when there’s a rupture in the blood vessels, informs Dr Marla. Hemorrhagic stroke leads to bleeding in or around the brain. Hypertension can also lead to hemorrhagic stroke as it can damage blood vessels inside the brain, resulting in rupture and bleeding in the brain between the skull and the brain tissue.

The link between diabetes and stroke

Dr Aditi Chopra, consultant, diabetes and endocrinology, Manipal Hospital, Old Airport Road, Bangalore, explains, “The primary way diabetes increases the risk of stroke is through atherosclerosis. When there is excess blood glucose circulating through the blood vessels, it ends up damaging the inner arterial lining. This could accelerate plaque formation and excess fat deposition, leading to the narrowing of the artery. This could directly increase the risk of strokes because of the high chances of clot formation. When atherosclerosis affects the arteries supplying blood to the brain (carotid arteries), it can significantly increase the risk of a stroke.”

According to the American Stroke Association, people with diabetes are twice as likely to have a stroke as people without diabetes.

Dr Marla shares that in people with diabetes, stroke can be caused by hyperglycemia-associated blood viscosity. He adds, that when people have high blood sugar, the blood becomes thick and more viscous. This makes it hard for the heart to pump blood and increases the risk of clot formation. Clots can block blood vessels in the brain, which can trigger a stroke.

Older people are at greater risk of stroke, says Dr Pandey. Other factors include hypertension, high cholesterol levels, and diabetes-related complications like neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, or diabetic nephropathy.

People with both type 1 and type 2 have the same possibility of developing a stroke”, says Dr Pandey. However, those with type 1 diabetes are at greater risk of having a stroke early since they have had diabetes for a longer period.

The common signs of brain stroke include drooping of facial muscles, speech difficulty, disorientation, and muscle weakness, especially in arms, caused mainly due to neural damage in the brain. If these symptoms are observed in a disoriented person, it could be a stroke and swift medical attention is crucial. These typical signs of a stroke are called FAST (facial drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulties and time to call for medical help).

Preventing diabetes-induced stroke

Takeaways

People with diabetes are at a higher risk of stroke. Managing blood sugar levels is a must. This, along with a healthy diet, avoiding smoking and alcohol and regulating blood pressure can help reduce the risk of diabetes-induced stroke.

Share Your Experience/Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Summit Registration

NOTE: The summit will be held at NIMHANS Convention Centre, Bengaluru.

Wellness Registration Form

-
-
-
Total Amount INR 3000
Trending

Articles

Article
Some couples consciously decide not to have children despite familial and social expectations, wanting to make the best of their relationship. Children should be had for their own sake, says psychotherapist Tasneem Nakhoda
Article
Insufficient consumption of heart-healthy foods can affect cardiovascular health. Experts discuss beneficial dietary choices
Article
Cycling and walking are both great cardiovascular activities that aid weight loss and keep various health conditions away. Pick one that suits your fitness goals and physical condition, say experts
Article
The risk of heart attacks and strokes for middle-aged, overweight people with high blood pressure is 35 percent higher compared to those with a healthy body weight 
Article
Summer drinks, though hydrating, can have excess sugar. Nutritionists suggest a few alternatives to keep the body temperature and sugar levels down
Article
Packed with protein, this recipe will help in weight management by keeping you full for a long time
Trending

Articles

Article
Some couples consciously decide not to have children despite familial and social expectations, wanting to make the best of their relationship. Children should be had for their own sake, says psychotherapist Tasneem Nakhoda
Article
Insufficient consumption of heart-healthy foods can affect cardiovascular health. Experts discuss beneficial dietary choices
Article
Cycling and walking are both great cardiovascular activities that aid weight loss and keep various health conditions away. Pick one that suits your fitness goals and physical condition, say experts

0

0

0

Web Stories 

0

0

0

0

0

0

Opt-in To Our Daily Healthzine

A potion of health & wellness delivered daily to your inbox

Personal stories and insights from doctors, plus practical tips on improving your happiness quotient

Opt-in To Our Daily Healthzine

A potion of health & wellness delivered daily to your inbox

Personal stories and insights from doctors, plus practical tips on improving your happiness quotient
We use cookies to customize your user experience, view our policy here

Your feedback has been submitted successfully.

The Happiest Health team will reach out to you at the earliest